Author Topic: Defender TD5 Rebuild  (Read 2796 times)

binch

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Re: Defender TD5 Rebuild
« Reply #105 on: June 24, 2020, 04:18 PM »
Why not just buy the panels pre-made and primer coated.    Most of the panels for the (real) defender are still readily available.    YRM is a good little cottage company not too far from Tow Law, on the back side of a small farm.    And we can get stuff from them shipped with our orders. ;)
Cheers, Bill

mike.heathcote

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Re: Defender TD5 Rebuild
« Reply #106 on: June 25, 2020, 09:51 AM »
You may want to check with Ivor Wilde, out in Sundre - I believe he's in the phone book. 

A couple years ago I got some front wings off him for Dad's 110.  The panels were new, unprimed - he might still have a couple other panels about, too. 

ugly_90

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Re: Defender TD5 Rebuild
« Reply #107 on: June 25, 2020, 10:26 AM »
I wonder if i'm missing something in the thread here. It seemed like the question was on sources of alloy of locally obtained aluminum plate. Areas like the two floor plates, the two flat rear ends of the defender tub, and other areas are easily replaced with a bit of metalwork and scrap material if one is handy, at little to no cost if one is frugal.

The complex bends in a side fender or wing are better to be replaced with new or used. Door skins are affordable as aftermarket as well. Any of these Britpart or YRM specific parts could likely await a seacan order to keep costs down too.

grizzlychicken

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Defender TD5 Rebuild
« Reply #108 on: June 25, 2020, 11:11 AM »
So yes I was talking mostly about the rear floor and the rear wheel wells which are both around 13 gauge. The wheel wells and the piece that connects the rear 2nd row seating to the rear floor are pretty straight forward 90 degree bends.

My rear quarry panel skin is in rough shape so debating on whether to replace that and as you say you can get panels prefabed from the uk but it is not super cheap. The best pricing I found was from lrparts.net and just for the 2 rear skins with shipping it is £500 so $1000 and there will be duty on top of that.
So the material cost for both rear skins in 18 gauge if I bought the 6061 and formed them myself would be $100 but like you say there is one complex radius bend. 

Or I live with the current panel and bodywork and bondo it which is possible.

The front 1/4 panel I need I would just replace with a premade unit as the curves are more complex and the panel is actually relatively cheap at £250 delivered so $500.

Otherwise I’m not sure of a source of second hand panels in Alberta. Anyone have spares?
Mike I’ll try ivor. Is he part of the club?


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grizzlychicken

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Re: Defender TD5 Rebuild
« Reply #109 on: June 30, 2020, 07:59 PM »
Well time for an update on this rainy Tuesday!  I have been working away slowly and moved onto the engine.

The TD5 I have was pretty oil and dirty. There have been multiple oil leaks in its life. So first job was to clean things up.



If you can’t take the engine to the parts washer, bring the parts washer to the engine!

https://youtu.be/6IE4t0Estd4

Degreased and then after attacking it with a brass wheel.



Then painted up the block.



And cleans up nicely!



Now there was a leak in the flywheel side seal so replaced that but the sump seal didn’t appear great and it looked like some of the leak was coming from there so decided to replace that. Easy way was to flip the engine over. Love this engine stand!



Cleaned up the block face and the sump face with some scotch brite pads.
Then inspected the gasket and as suspected it was compressed and had multiple cracks in it:




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grizzlychicken

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Re: Defender TD5 Rebuild
« Reply #110 on: June 30, 2020, 08:04 PM »
Ok then went and flipped the engine upright again and pulled off the rocker cover. The gasket again was a mess and had been filled with goop probably to stop the oil seepage.
After a bunch of scraping and scotchbrite/brass brush it turned out great and installed a new rocker cover gasket

 
I think that should solve most of the oil seepage issues :)


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grizzlychicken

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Defender TD5 Rebuild
« Reply #111 on: June 30, 2020, 08:45 PM »
So part of my engine refreshing was to do a idea performance upgrades. So I ordered A few cool bits from ali sport.
First I am upgrading the exhaust manifold. Most off you all know that the td5 manifold wasn’t the best design. The webs between each exhaust port on the manifold tend to retain heat and are prone to warpage and doesn’t clear exhaust gasses very well.
Here is a side by side of both manifolds:


The original engine studs are also quite short and can break off with heat. The new manifold comes with longer stud an spacers to absorb some of the heat expansion of the manifold.
 Th was

So I decided to get the manifold ceramic coated which also is supposed to help with directing heat better through the turbo and exhaust. It also looks slick and will help stop it rusting.


And yes as you can see I decided to go with a variable vein turbo from alisport/turbo technik. As you can see I decided to pull it apart and have the snail part ceramic coated too. Again for both directing heat and for corrosion and looks :)


 


It is pretty cool to see how the variable rate turbo engineering works:

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https://youtu.be/ikUi_Es4Clw
« Last Edit: June 30, 2020, 09:08 PM by grizzlychicken »

Red90

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Re: Defender TD5 Rebuild
« Reply #112 on: June 30, 2020, 09:07 PM »
You are officially going completely overboard.   ;D

grizzlychicken

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Re: Defender TD5 Rebuild
« Reply #113 on: June 30, 2020, 09:11 PM »
You are officially going completely overboard.   ;D
Ha yup I feel like man overboard during most of this project. Learning lots and fell like I’m bumbling about most of the time :) 80% of the time is looking for that bolt I know I put somewhere safe!


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Matt H

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Re: Defender TD5 Rebuild
« Reply #114 on: July 01, 2020, 02:24 PM »
Nice. I like the exhaust manifold & turbo upgrades.
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binch

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Re: Defender TD5 Rebuild
« Reply #115 on: July 01, 2020, 11:44 PM »
yup, a complete mad man ;D    But I'm loving this detailed write up of yours.  Brilliant!!!!!

3 thumbs up!   
Cheers, Bill

grizzlychicken

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Re: Defender TD5 Rebuild
« Reply #116 on: July 02, 2020, 02:13 AM »
Ha thanks Bill. We are getting there!

Ok feels like big progress when you put the drivetrain together. Engine is in!


Then installed the new flywheel and clutch assembly:


Changed out the thrust bearing to the heavy duty version.


Put the transmission/ transfer case assembly together for install


And end result is satisfying!





Now to install all the fixings. Electrical, fuel lines and tank, and bulkhead next. Trying to approach it in systems. Have to figure out where all these little brackets and clips go and which way all the bits wrap around one another.
Still a lot of work to do. Let me know if anyone is bored and wants to come swing a wrench in Canmore in a covid free way ;)


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binch

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Re: Defender TD5 Rebuild
« Reply #117 on: July 02, 2020, 05:33 AM »
Oh, now that's just looking to good to take it out of the garage again.   That first pine stripe is going to hurt ROFL

Looking very good!!!!
Cheers, Bill

grizzlychicken

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Re: Defender TD5 Rebuild
« Reply #118 on: July 02, 2020, 09:25 AM »
Ok my mechanic friends! So I am looking back through the manual (as well as forward!) and I have a question about the sump gasket install. When I installed mine it seems to seal up nicely with no gaps etc. when looking at the manual it says to put a couple of beads of silicon in a few places.

How important are the silicon beads to prevent oil seepage? I think I have a pretty good seal but now is the time if I want to add that extra layer. I’m pretty sure I can do I with the trans in place. Thoughts?


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DBrands

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Re: Defender TD5 Rebuild
« Reply #119 on: July 02, 2020, 09:37 AM »
Ok my mechanic friends! So I am looking back through the manual (as well as forward!) and I have a question about the sump gasket install. When I installed mine it seems to seal up nicely with no gaps etc. when looking at the manual it says to put a couple of beads of silicon in a few places.

How important are the silicon beads to prevent oil seepage? I think I have a pretty good seal but now is the time if I want to add that extra layer. I’m pretty sure I can do I with the trans in place. Thoughts?

I have very little experience with a TD5, but both of those locations appear to be where the oil pan gasket contacts another gasket, correct? That has the potential to be a leak point if the intersecting seal "shrinks" away from the oil pan gasket. If you didn't change either of those gaskets the likelihood of a gap occurring is much lower (as long as there wasn't a gap apparent when you replaced the pan gasket). Might be worthwhile to do it as a precaution seeing how much work you've been doing to re-fresh...

Check the UK forums to see how often people talk about it... might give you an idea of how likely it is to leak.
David B

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